City Mayors reports on local elections from around the world



FRONT PAGE
About us






Worldwide | Elections | North America | Latin America | Europe | Asia | Africa |


























Local election news from across the world

NEWS SECTIONS: World news | Election news | News from Europe | News from North America | News from Latin America | News from Asia and Australia | News from Africa | Urban events | NEWS SPECIALS: The 2011 London riots | The 2010 Love Parade tragedy | Latest news story |


Pro-European parties
win in Moldova’s
municipal elections

Chisinau, 30 June 2015:
Moldova’s pro-European political parties have emerged strengthened from Sunday’s local elections after the incumbent mayor of Chisinau, the country’s capital city, defeated his pro-Russian challenger. With the results confirmed, Dorin Chirtoaca, the re-elected mayor, urged the pro-European parties in the national parliament to end their squabbles and form a united government. Across the country, pro-European candidates captured 17 counties while parties, who advocate stronger links with Russia, won in eleven counties.

Dorin Chirtoaca, who has been mayor of Chisinau since 2007, won 53.5 per cent of the vote, against 46.5 per cent for his pro-Russian challenger, Zinaida Greceanai, a former prime minister. In Sunday’s run-off elections, votes were cast in 458 towns. Pro-Russian mayoral candidates won in Baltu, Moldova’s second-largest city, and in the eastern city of Orhei.

Chisinau has a population of almost half a million. Dorin Chirtoaca, who begins his third term in office this week, is also vice president of the Liberal Party of Moldova and previously worked for the Helsinki Committee for Human Rights.


Albania’s Socialists
triumph after local
government reforms

Tirana, 25 June 2015:
Albania’s ruling Socialist Party and its allies won 46 out 61 mayoral races in last Sunday’s local elections. Erion Veliaj, a former social affairs minister, defeated his rightist opponent in the country’s capital Tirana. Socialist Prime Minister Edi Rama, who was Tirana’s mayor from 2000 to 2011 and in 2004 was awarded the World Mayor Prize, called the elections the fairest the country has ever held but acknowledged comments by international observers who said national politicians had become too much involved in the campaign. They also criticised the unnecessary harsh und insulting language used by candidates from all parties.

A spokesman for Edi Rama said that the conduct of the elections had shown that Albania was capable of holding fair and free elections and that the country should now be allowed to launch its bid for full EU membership. Although Albania was granted EU candidate status, getting approval for the launch of full membership negotiations will in part depend on whether the Balkan nation can organise free and fair elections.

Some 162 candidates competed for the 61 mayoral posts on offer while more than 36,000 contested council seats. Following recent reforms, the number of local authorities in Albania was reduced from 373 to 61. Under the new system, the size of Tirana increased from 420,000 to more than one million people.


Italy’s centre-left
wins most votes but
loses in stronghold

Rome, 2 June 2015:
Italy’s ruling Democratic Party (PD) won most votes in last weekend’s local and regional elections but lost one of its provincial strongholds due to internal divisions. According to preliminary results, the centre-left PD captured 24 per cent of the vote, with the protest Five Star Movement second on 18 per cent. The right-wing Northern League was supported by 13 per cent of voters, while Forza Italia of the disgraced former Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi only managed 11 per cent.

While the Democratic Party of Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, who was Mayor of Florence from 2009 to 2014, remained the largest party in five out of seven provinces where elections took place, the party lost control of Liguria due to internal divisions. A rebellious group from within the PD, which objected to the Prime Minister’s ‘dictatorial’ style, put up its own candidates and thus handed victory to a populist front, which included the Northern League.

As expected, the Northern League held on to its stronghold Veneto, in northern Italy, and, surprisingly, came second in Tuscany. Party leader Matteo Salvini claimed that the Northern League was now the only viable opposition to the centre-left Democrats after Forza Italia finished a distant fourth in the weekend’s elections.

Matteo Salvini has used the influx of thousand of migrants from North Africa to promote his xenophobic views. He even chided Pope Francis for encouraging dialogue with Muslims.

Salvini’s assertion was, however, ridiculed by the Five Star Movement, which pointed out that it had won five percentage points more votes than the Northern League. The anti-establishment movement led by former comedian Beppe Grillo won some 20 per cent of the vote in the Provinces of Liguria, Puglia and Marche and close to 15 per cent in the remaining four regions.

Commentators said that support for Five Star strengthened after the recent success of the Spanish protest parties.

In addition to voting in regional ballots, Italians also elected mayors in several hundred towns. Results are expected later this week.


Upstarts humiliate
main parties in Spain’s
municipal elections

Madrid, 26 May 2015:
Despite coming first and second in Sunday’s local elections, Spain’s conservative People’s Party (PP) and the Socialist Workers Party (PSOE) lost overall control of many regions and cities. To govern they will now either have to join forces or seek the support of new, post-austerity political groups such as the centrist Ciudadanos (Citizens) and the leftist Podemos (We Can). In Barcelona a member of Spain’s Occupy movement (Indignados) defeated the incumbent mayor, while in Madrid, the conservative candidate could lose out to a coalition between the Socialists and Podemos. In the Valencia region, a stronghold of the PP, the party lost its absolute majority. The region has become synonymous with corruption in local government, with five serving mayors being indicted for corruption.

For almost four decades, Spain enjoyed – or suffered from – a political ping-pong between the Socialist Party and the People’s Party, which brought stability but also led to corruption and nepotism particularly in local government. After the collapse of the property market and the banking crisis, which led to unemployment rates of as high as 25 per cent, many Spaniards yearned for political change.

The leftist Podemos was founded in 2014 by Pablo Iglesias, a lecturer in political science, and only four months after its foundation the new party gained eight per sent of the vote in elections for the European parliament. The centrist Ciudadanos started in 2006 in Catalonia where it opposes calls for independence. In 2013 it decided to become a national force campaigning against entrenched corruption.

Preliminary results of Sunday’s elections show that the People’s Party received 27 per cent of votes cast across the country, with the Socialists on 25 per cent. Compared to four years ago, the PP lost some ten percentage points, while the vote for the Socialists declined by some 2.5 points. With the support of almost seven per cent of voters, Ciudadanos is now the third-largest party in Spain with seats in almost all the regional assemblies. Podemos did not put up candidates in all regions.

In Madrid, the PP, supporting the mayoral candidate Esperanza Aguirre, secured 21 seats and 34.5 per cent of votes, while Manuela Cardena, the candidate of Ahora - a coalition linked to Podemos - won 20 seats and 31.8 per cent of votes cast. An alliance with the PSOE, which won 15.3 per cent and nine seats, would give Cardena a majority on the Madrid council and allow her to govern.

More than 35 million people were eligible to vote for 8,122 mayors and regional government leaders in 13 regions.


Bremen’s ruling party seeks
new leader after the sudden
resignation of the mayor

Bremen, 14 May 2015:
Bremen’s mayor resigned after his Social Democratic Party (SPD) suffered heavy losses in last Sunday’s local elections. Although the Social Democrats will remain the largest party in the city state parliament and be able to form an adminstration with either the Green Party or the conservative Christian Democrats, Jens Böhrnsen felt that somebody younger should take over after the party’s share of the vote fell from more than 38 per cent of the vote in 2011 to 33 per cent. The Greens, the junior partner in the SPD-led coalition, suffered even greater losses. Its share of the vote dropped from 22.5 per cent to little more than 15 per cent.

The conservative Christian Democrats (CDU), Bremen’s main opposition party, did not benefit substantially from the government losses. The main winners were the pro-business Free Democrats (FDP) and the anti-immigration Alternative for Germany (AfD). The FDP saw a surge in support, gaining 6.6 per cent of the vote, an increase of more than four percentage points, while the AfD, which did not contest the 2011 elections, attracted 5.5 per cent. The Left Party (Linke) benefited from SDP misfortune by increasing its share of the vote by almost four percentage points to 9.5 per cent.

For the Social Democrats, who recorded their worst result since 1946, the resignation of Jens Böhrnsen came as a total shock. Not only will the party have to quickly find a successor but it must also decide whether to start coalition negations with the Greens or the Christian Democrats. The outgoing mayor supported a continuation of the coalition with the Green Party but the local SPD president is said to favour a SPD/CDU administrations. He has pointed out that a SPD/Green coalition would only have a majority of two in the new parliament, while the SPD together with the CDU commanded 50 out of 83 seats.

Jens Böhrnsen has been Bremen’s mayor since 2005 and is Germany’s longest-serving state governor. Following his resignation, there have been renewed calls for the SDP to consider Böhrnsen as its candidate for German President, should the current office holder, Joachim Gauck, decide not to run for a second term. In 2010 after the then head of state Horst Köhler unexpectedly stepped down, Jens Böhrnsen took over as interim president and won approval from all sides of Germany’s political spectrum.


Mayoral elections in
Bangladesh’s largest cities
marred by fraud allegations

Dhaka, 3 May 2015:
Last week’s mayoral elections in Bangladesh’s three largest municipalities, Dhaka North, Dhaka South and Chittagong, were marred by allegations of large-scale vote rigging. A statement by a European Union monitoring team said that there were credible reports of vote rigging, intimidations and violence during voting in Dhaka and Chittagong on 28 April. The US embassy in Dhaka added that it also had received first-hand and credible reports of election fraud. The three mayoral elections were won by candidates backed by the country’s ruling Awami League after the opposition Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) withdrew its nominees on the morning of polling day.

The elections were supposed to be non-partisan but both major parties openly supported individual candidates. The mayoral races in Dhaka and Chittagong were meant to herald a return of political normality to Bangladesh after last year’s parliamentary elections were boycotted by the BNP and other opposition groups. However, just as polling started, the BNP announced that it was withdrawing from the elections. Opposition-back candidates accused Awami League activists of having taken control of polling stations and forcing opposition polling agents to quit.

A spokesman for the Awami League denied accusations of intimidations and said the BNP was trying to undermine the elections. He added that the BNP pulled out because it anticipated defeat. “It was pre-planned to cover up the party’s unpopularity.”

The Head of the Bangladesh Election Commission, Kazi Rakibuddin Ahmad, said the elections had been free and fair but, in both Dhaka and Chittagong, independent election observers reported acts of intimidation, multiple voting and ballot box stuffing.

Annisul Hug won the mayoral election in Dhaka North, while Sayeed Khokon, also supported by the Awami League, was elected mayor in Dhaka South. In Chittagong, the Awami League candidate A J M Nasir Uddin defeated the incumbent mayor who was backed by the BNP.

In 2011, Dhaka was divided into two administrative parts, Dhaka North and Dhaka South, to provide the city’s almost eight million residents with more reliable services. Schools in both parts of the city are governed by the Dhaka Education Board.


Government parties and
opposition Communists
win in Japan local elections

Tokyo, 18 April 2015:
Japan’s ruling Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) and its allies triumphed in last weekend’s local elections, while its main rival, the centre-left Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ), was left licking its wounds. The Japanese Communist Party, however, achieved its best results for eight years. Commentators accused the DPJ of timidness. Not only did the party field considerable fewer candidates in the prefectural assembly elections than four years ago, it actually backed six LDP incumbents in gubernatorial contests and failed to find suitable candidates in another two prefectures including in the home region of its new leader Katsuya Okada. Only in the prefectures of Hokkaida and Oita did the DPJ field contestants, who were both defeated. The party did, however, win the mayoral election in the City of Sapporo.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s centre-right Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) won most seats, most governors and most mayors in the first half of nationwide local elections. It captured 1,153 prefectural assembly seats, 10 governorships and was successful in four out of five mayoral elections. The second batch of elections will be held on 28 April.

After last weekend’s elections - held on 12 April - Japan’s Communist Party will for the first time be represented in all of the country’s 47 prefectural assemblies, after it won 100 seats.

The LDP’s election success, if repeated on 28 April, will encourage the prime minister to continue with his nationalist policies, including the strengthening of Japan’s military, the self-defence forces.

Media commentators deplored the low voter turnout of just over 45 per cent and blamed the record number of uncontested seats for a declining public interest in local elections. “When the official campaign kicked off on 3 April, races for roughly 22 per cent of all the seats in the 41 prefectures were over because not enough candidates emerged to necessitate elections in many constituencies. More than one in five prefectural assembly members won their seats uncontested, with LDP members accounting for about 70 per cent of them,” the Japan Times wrote in an editorial column.


Tactical voting keeps
French National Front
out of big cities

Paris, 31 March 2015:
Tactical voting prevented the right-wing French National Front (FN) from winning any metropolitan seats in the second round of departmental elections held on 29 March. Many voters from the left, the centre-left and the centre-right overcame their mutual antipathies and chose the runners most likely to defeat National Front candidates. While in rural and small-town France, the Socialist Party (PS) suffered heavy losses, it, together with its left-wing allies, won the majority of seats in the country's largest cities. But the centre-right UMP party (Union pour un mouvement populaire) and its partners became the strongest political force in cities like Nice, Reims and Toulon. The National Front came very close to gaining a seat in Marseille when it won 49.8 per cent in canton 6 of the city.

Second-round results from France’s major cities.
(Due to their special status within France, no elections were held in Paris or Lyon)

Angers (7 cantons, constituencies)
Socialists and allies win 4 seats
UMP and allies win 3 seats
FN wins none (no seats contested)

Bordeaux (5 cantons)
Socialists and allies win 3 seats
UMP and allies win 2 seats
FN wins none (contested one seat, achieving some 15% support)

Dijon (6 cantons)
Socialists and allies win 4 seats
UMP and allies win 2 seats
FN wins none (contested 2 seats, achieving support of 23% and 38%)

Grenoble (4 cantons)
Socialists and allies win 4 seats
UMP and allies win none
FN wins none (no seats contested)

Le Havre (6 cantons)
Socialists and allies win 2 seats
UMP and allies win 4 seats
FN wins none (contested 5 seats, achieving an average support of 30%)

Lille (6 cantons)
Socialists and allies win 4 seats
UMP and allies win 2 seats
FN wins none (contested 5 seats, average support of 25% to 30%)

Marseille (12 cantons)
Socialists and allies win 6 seats
UMP and allies win 6 seats
FN wins none (contested 11 seats, achieving a support of 40% to 45% in Socialist held seats and 30% to 35% in UMP held seats)

Montpellier (6 cantons)
Socialists and allies win 5seats
UMP and allies win 1 seat
FN wins none (contested 4 seats, achieving 25% to 30% support)

Nantes (7 cantons)
Socialists and allies win 7 seats
UMP and allies win no seats
FN wins none (contested 1 seat, achieving 24% support)

Nice (9 cantons)
Socialists and allies win no seats
UMP and allies win 9 seats
FN wins none (contested all 9 seats, achieving 42% to 45% support)

Reims (9 cantons)
Socialists and allies win 3 seats
UMP and allies win 6 seats
FN wins none (contested 8 seats, achieving 32% to 37% support)

Rennes (6 cantons)
Socialists and allies win 6 seats
UMP and allies win no seats
FN wins none (none contested)

St Etiennes (6 cantons)
Socialists and allies win 3 seats
UMP and allies win 3 seats
FN wins none (contested 3 seats, achieving an average of 30% support)

Strasbourg (6 cantons)
Socialists and allies win 4 seats
UMP and allies win 2 seats
FN wins none (contested 2 seats, achieving an average of 30% support)

Toulon (4 cantons)
Socialists and allies win no seats
UMP and allies win 4seats
FN wins none (contested all 4 seats, achieving 35% to 38% support)

Toulouse (11 cantons)
Socialists and allies win 8 seats
UMP and allies win 2 seats
FN wins none (contested no seats)

OVERALL (110 metropolitan cantons)
Socialist and allies win 63 seats
UMP and allies win 47 seats
FN wins none

The second round of French departmental elections were ‘binôme’ - with tandems consisting of two names. Each tandem had a male and female candidate. This new rule to elect both a man and a woman is a push for greater gender equality in the departments.


Socialist Party loses
its dominance in
metropolitan France

Paris, 24 March 2015:
Following last Sunday’s departmental elections, the Socialists are no longer the natural ruling party in metropolitan France. While, after the first round of voting, the Socialist Party (PS) and its allies came first in a majority of the country’s urban cantons (constituencies), its lead over the centre-right coalition of former President Nicolas Sarkozy was due to its strength in not more than a handful of cities. Left-wing parties topped the polls in 48 metropolitan cantons, while centre-right parties won in 45 cantons. The far-right National Front (FN) received the largest number of votes in 16 cantons. A second round of elections will be held this coming Sunday.

Results from France’s major cities.
(Due to their special status within France, no elections were held in Paris or Lyon)

Anger
7 cantons: Left wing parties lead in 3; Centre-right parties lead in 4; The National Front leads in 0

Bordeaux
5 cantons: Left wing parties lead in 1; Centre-right parties lead in 4; The National Front leads in 0

Dijon
6 cantons: Left wing parties lead in 5; Centre-right parties lead in 1; The National Front leads in 0

Grenoble
4 cantons: Left wing parties lead in 5; Centre-right parties lead in 0; The National Front leads in 0

Le Havre
6 cantons: Left wing parties lead in 1; Centre-right parties lead in 3; The National Front leads in 2

Lille
6 cantons: Left wing parties lead in 3; Centre-right parties lead in 2; The National Front leads in 1

Marseille
12 cantons: Left wing parties lead in 2; Centre-right parties lead in 3; The National Front leads in 7

Montpellier
6 cantons: Left wing parties lead in 3; Centre-right parties lead in 1; The National Front leads in 2

Nantes
7 cantons: Left wing parties lead in 7; Centre-right parties lead in 0; The National Front leads in 0

Nice
9 cantons: Left wing parties lead in 0; Centre-right parties lead in 7; The National Front leads in 2

Reims
9 cantons: Left wing parties lead in 2; Centre-right parties lead in 5; The National Front leads in 2

St Etienne
6 cantons: Left wing parties lead in 3; Centre-right parties lead in 3; The National Front leads in 0

Strasbourg
6 cantons: Left wing parties lead in 4; Centre-right parties lead in 2; The National Front leads in 0

Toulon
4 cantons: Left wing parties lead in 0; Centre-right parties lead in 4; The National Front leads in 0

Toulouse
11 cantons: Left wing parties lead in 9; Centre-right parties lead in 2; The National Front leads in 0

Across the whole of urban and rural France, the centre-right UMP (Union pour un mouvement populaire) and its allies received some 29 per cent of the vote, ahead of the National Front (FN) on 25 per cent, followed by the Socialist Party and its allies on 22 per cent. In the second round, voters will be asked to choose between the winner and runner-up in each canton. The FN, having come first or second in almost half of all cantons, will fight for some 1,100 seats. Left-wing parties will be absent in a quarter of all cantons, which is unprecedented.

Sunday’s second round will be ‘binôme’ - with tandems consisting of two names. Each tandem will have a male and female candidate. This new rule to elect both a man and a woman is a push for greater gender equality in the departments. In 2011, less than a quarter of first round candidates were women.


French National Front
predicted to win first
round of local elections

Paris, 23 February 2015:
A recent opinion poll conducted for Le Figaro newspaper predicts that the right-wing National Front (FN) will be the winner in next month’s French departmental elections. According to Ifop’s research the party of Marine Le Pen will gain some 30 per cent of votes cast in the first round on 22 March. The poll puts the centre right coalition of UMP (Union pour un Mouvement Populaire) and UDI on 28 per cent ahead of the ruling Socialist Party (PS) on 20 per cent. Five years ago, under the leadership of Ms Le Pen’s father Jean-Marie, the FN secured 11.4 per cent behind the Greens, the centre-right and the Socialists.

But commentators point out that winning the popular vote in the first round of next month’s elections will not guarantee the National Front a majority of seats as the parties of the left and centre will support each other in the second round of voting on 29 March.

In a recent parliamentary by-election in eastern France, the FN candidate won most votes in the first round but lost to the Socialists in the run-off. In last year’s municipal elections the FN captured eleven towns but failed to capture many of its key targets including Avignon and Perpignan. While centre parties secured almost 100,000 municipal council seats and the Socialists and its allies some 67,000, the National Front only won 1,600 seats.

After initially announcing that it would field candidates in Parisian suburbs, Lyon and Marseille, the newly formed Union of French Muslim Democrats (UDMF) said it didn’t have the resources to contest seats outside Marseille.

France has 101 departments, which fall between the 36,680 local communities and 27 regions. It is anticipated that they will lose their powers in forthcoming local government reforms.


Hamburg’s mayor denies
national ambitions
after winning re-election

Hamburg, 18 February 2015:
The newly re-elected Mayor of Hamburg has denied media speculation that he wants to lead his Social Democratic Party (SPD) in Germany’s next national elections in 2017. After Olav Scholz and his party won an impressive victory in last Sunday’s local elections, he has been described by many commentators as the only centre-left politician who could successfully challenge the German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the ballot box. Even Ms Merkel, whose conservative Christian Democratic Union (CDU) leads a national coalition government with the SDP, described Mayor Scholz as very competent and down-to-earth, adding that many supporters of her own party appreciated the Mayor’s work. “Olav Scholz did not make any mistakes as mayor.”

In Sunday’s elections in Hamburg, one of Germany’s three city states, the SPD won almost 46 per cent of the vote, while the CDU’s share of the vote fell from 21 per cent four years ago to just 16 per cent. The Greens came third with 12 per cent followed by the leftist Linke, the liberal Free Democrats and the right-wing AfD (Alternative for Germany) party.

Before the election, Olav Scholz said that the Greens would be his preferred coalition partner but warned the environmentalists, who gained 12 per cent, not to be to greedy with their demands. The two parties are divided over the dredging of the River Elbe, which the Social Democrats believe is necessary to allow the city’s port to maintain its competitive edge over Rotterdam and Antwerp. The Greens say the damage to the environment would be too great. Klaus von Dohnanyi, a former mayor of Hamburg, advised Scholz to negotiate with the pro-business Free Democrats instead.

With the exception of the Christian Democrats, all parties had something to celebrate. For the Free Democrats, the Hamburg result was the party’s best outcome since its failure to win any seats in Germany national parliament (Bundestag) in 2013. The Greens and the Linke both increased their share of the vote, while the AfD won its first representation in a Western German regional parliament.


Whistle blower alleges
widespread fraud in
Turkish local elections

Ankara, 13 January 2015:
Pressure is mounting on the Turkish justice ministry to conduct a widespread review into allegations of fraud at last March’s local elections after a former employee of the country’s governing Justice and Development Party (AKP) asserted that the party had been determined to win the elections at all costs. The individual, who worked for the AKP’s ‘Election Coordination Centre’ provided examples how the ruling party allegedly influenced opinion polls, tried to prevent observers from opposition parties to attend ballot counts and managed to inflate its own results by creating fake voters.

The whistle blower, who made the allegations on condition of anonymity, told the Taraf newspaper that Turkey’s ruling party had made preparations to win at all cost months before the local elections on 30 March 2014. He claimed that many of the party’s regional and district offices were involved in the fraud. For example, it is alleged that the party put pressure on polling companies to provide election forecasts favourable to the AKP. The informant claimed that AKP officials wanted to be sure that a victory by the government party would not be questioned after the elections.

It has also been alleged that there was collusion between some returning officers and AKP officials. “It was suggested to officials supervising the count to make deliberate mistakes.” The informant cites an example where 320 votes for the opposition Republican People’s Party (CHP) were recorded as 32. “Were the mistake later to be discovered it could be explained away as a human error.”

The allegations or widespread fraud in Turkey’s March local elections are not new. In April, four days after the elections, the Financial Times reported that Mansur Yavas, the opposition candidate for mayor of Ankara demanded a recount because 250 ballot boxes, representing some 75,000 votes, were incorrectly entered into the central electoral system. At that time the challenger for mayor was less than 35,000 votes behind the incumbent mayor. Mansur Yavas also claimed that there were 58,000 duplicate records in Ankara alone that would allow select voters to vote twice.





World Mayor 2014
The results of World Mayor 2014 were announced on 3 February 2015




Pro-European parties win in Moldova’s municipal elections



Albania’s Socialists triumph after local government reforms
(Photo: Tirana's new socialist mayor Erion Veliaj)


Italy’s centre-left wins most votes but loses in stronghold



Upstarts humiliate main parties in Spain’s municipal elections
(Photo: Pablo Iglesias, leader of Podemos)


Bremen’s ruling party seeks new leader after the sudden resignation of the mayor
(Photo: Bremen City Hall)


Mayoral elections in Bangladesh’s largest cities marred by fraud allegations



Government parties and opposition Communists win in Japan local elections



Tactical voting keeps French National Front out of big cities



Socialist Party loses its dominance in metropolitan France



French National Front predicted to win first round of local elections
(Photo: Marine Le Pen, leader of the French National Front)


Hamburg’s mayor denies national ambitions after winning re-election
(Photo: Hamburg Mayor Olav Scholz)


Whistle blower alleges widespread fraud in Turkish local elections