Inside Ekaterinburg City Hall, a gallery depicts images of all the city's mayors since 1723



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City Mayors investigates health issues affecting urban areas with an emphasis on health in cities in developing countries. More


City Mayors reports on how business developments impact on cities and examines cooperation between cities and the private sector. More


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City Mayors questions those who govern the world’s cities and talks to men and women who contribute to urban society and environment. More


City Mayors profiles national and international organisations representing cities as well as those dealing with urban issues. More


City Mayors reports on major national and international sporting events and their impact on cities. More


City Mayors lists cities and city organisations, profiles individual mayors and provides information on hundreds of urban events. More


City Mayors reports news from towns and cities around the world. Worldwide | Elections | North America | Latin America | Europe | Asia | Africa |


City Mayors ranks the world’s largest, best as well as richest cities and urban areas. It also ranks the cities in individual countries, and provides a list of the capital cities of some 200 sovereign countries. More


City Mayors profiles city leaders from around the world. More


City Mayors describes the history, architecture and politics of the greatest city halls in the world. More


Mayors from The Americas, Europe. Asia, Australia and Africa compete for the World Mayor Award. More


Use
Mayor Monitor to rate the performance of mayors from across the world More


In your opinion: Praise Criticise. Write


City Mayors reports political events, analyses the issues and depicts the main players. More


City Mayors describes and explains the structures and workings of local government in Europe, The Americas, Asia, Australia and Africa. More


City Mayors deals with economic and investment issues affecting towns and cities. More


City Mayors describes and explains financial issues affecting local government. More


City Mayors reports urban environmental developments and examines the challenges faced by cities worldwide. More


City Mayors reports on and discusses urban development issues in developed and developing countries. More


City Mayors reports on developments in urban society and behaviour and reviews relevant research. More


City Mayors invites readers to write about the people in their cities. More


City Mayors examines city brands and marketing. More


City Mayors lists and features urban events, conferences and conventions aimed at urban decision makers and those with an interst in cities worldwide. More



City Mayors deals with urban transport issues in developed and developing countries and features the world’s greatest metro systems. More


City Mayors examines education issues and policies affecting children and adults in urban areas. More


City Mayors investigates health issues affecting urban areas with an emphasis on health in cities in developing countries. More


City Mayors reports on how business developments impact on cities and examines cooperation between cities and the private sector. More


City Mayors examines the contributions history and culture make to urban society and environment. More


City Mayors examines the importance of urban tourism to city economies. More


City Mayors questions those who govern the world’s cities and talks to men and women who contribute to urban society and environment. More


City Mayors profiles national and international organisations representing cities as well as those dealing with urban issues. More


City Mayors reports on major national and international sporting events and their impact on cities. More


City Mayors lists cities and city organisations, profiles individual mayors and provides information on hundreds of urban events. More


Ekaterinburg City Hall
By Alexey Pryadein

25 August 2005: Ekaterinburg City Hall was built in the early 1950s by German prisoners of war and was intended to be richly symbolic and unique. Its theme was to reflect the Great Victory of the Second World War. The decision to build this landmark was taken by the Council of Ministers to honour Ekaterinburg for its contribution to that victory.

Ekaterinburg richly deserved such recognition, since the people had worked 16 to 20 hours a day in the plants and factories of the city, where each third shell and missile and each second tank of the Soviet Army was manufactured.

Construction of Ekaterinburg’s City Administration (or Sverdlovsk as it was called during the Soviet period) became a symbol of the country’s post-war power. Built with German skill, the building is of the highest quality, surpassing that of any other in the city. It has an eclectic architecture with its style combining both classic and modern - a style typical of the architecture of the time, which is usually called “Stalin’s Triumph”.

It has five floors and a clock tower with large columns as a base. On the edge of the roof there are several statues portraying workers and peasants, illustrating the power of the “common people” who took priority in the Soviet Union.

On the front of the building the bass-relief portraits of local revolutionists are situated to remind people who brought the “communistic ideals” to the region. One interesting detail of the City Hall is at the entrance where a bass-relief imitates the arcade leading to the Red Square and Kremlin, intending to show the continuity of power from Moscow to the city and thus the unity of the country. Another detail shows the figures of soldiers holding up the tower of the City Hall by their shoulders, symbolising support and strength of the regime.

Thus, the entire design of the building was deeply symbolic. Today, after the Soviet Union’s collapse, the building (together with Lenin’s monument in front of the City Hall) has become its architectural and historical memorial.

The new era brought about new ideals. Now the city administration is creating and developing a new system of self-government, which means the necessity for new approaches and changes in ways of thinking for its citizens and administration. We have to realise that the city administration is something that is now elected by the citizens and consists of the citizens who must now be the captains of their own destinies.

We have to respect those people who work in the field of city development, and respect our history. That’s why the Gallery of Mayors has appeared in the City hall. This shows all the Mayors of Ekaterinburg (Sverdlovsk) from its inception in 1723. The gallery is unique in Russia and portrays the community as remembering its roots while at the same time thinking of a better future. The gallery begins with the statues of city founders V. Tatischev and F. de Gennin.

The City Hall of Ekaterinburg is one of the most interesting buildings both in Ekaterinburg and Russia. It represents Soviet architecture, while emphasising the city’s own unique history.


Ekaterinburg City Hall was built in the early 1950s by German prisoners of war


Introducing
Ekaterinburg

Ekaterinburg, with a population of some 1.5 million, is situated in central Russia on the east side of the Ural Mountains. Forests and lakes surround the city. Winters last for five months, from November to the middle of April, when temperatures can fall to minus 35 degrees Celsius. In the region’s short summers (two to three months) the temperature averages 20 degrees Celsius. The city is named after Ekaterina, the wife of Tsar Peter the Great.

The city was founded in 1723, as a centre for mining and as a gateway to the Urals and Siberia. The town owes its origin to a metallurgical and metal working plant which rose on the banks of the river Iset, and by the standards of those days was one of the best not only in Russia but also in Europe.

Shortly after the 1917 October Revolution, Russia’s last Tsar and his family were taken to Ekaterinburg. When in 1918, forces of White Russia were about to take the city from the Red Army, Tsar Nicolas and his family were executed. In 1924 the city was re-named Sverdlovsk after Sverdlov, a close associate of Lenin. After Perestroika, in 1992, the original name Ekaterinburg was returned to the city.

During World War II, many government technical institutions and whole industrial plants were evacuated to Yekaterinburg from the war-affected areas (mostly Moscow) and many remained in Ekaterinburg after the war was over.

Today Ekaterinburg is a modern city with tram, trolley, bus routes and a subway. There are more than 200 schools, 50 technical schools, 14 higher education institutions, including the Urals State University, founded in 1920; the Urals State Technical University, with more than 25,000 students, Ekaterinburg medical institute. Nine local TV channels and many radio stations broadcast their programmes in Ekaterinburg and the Sverdlovsk region. In the city there are six theaters, including an opera house, a circus, four  sports stadiums, several concert halls and museums. Over 600 libraries, including Belinski library founded in 1899, stock some 15 million books.

The city is served by a number of international airlines including Lufthansa and British Airways. More